Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Effective Non Verbal Communication At The Workplace

EFFECTIVE NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN VERBAL COMMUNICATION SKILLS IN THE WORKPLACE ASSIGNMENT BY: MUHAMMAD ATIF STUDENT ID: 140326 â€Å"Communication is the all of the procedures by which one mind can affect another† It can be characterized as the key that joins different variables of an association. It decides the achievement or disappointment of an association. Communication can be intra-individual, interpersonal, additional individual or it can be authoritative gathering. Communication inside an association can be inner or outside through verbal or non-verbal and can make impact on the beneficiary if the message is appropriately transmitted to the recipient through any mode and coveted yield is acquired. On the off chance that a supervisor can get work from the representatives through non-verbal Communication than he is getting the greatest yield from the workforce calm. So it is understood that at the workplace effective non-verbal communication is more important than verbal communication skills to get the work done in a proper manner and to achieve the desired results. (Mortensen, C. David, 2008), Communication theory. The request here is that whether Non-verbal Communication is more foremost than verbal Communication inclination at the workplace. In our livelihood as a thought master, we will be talking with a grouping of people reliably. Communication will happen eye toShow MoreRelatedThe Importance of Non-Verbal Communication929 Words   |  4 PagesIntroduction Non-verbal communication has been a major factor contributing towards our day to day lives. In terms of design and workplace as well as cultural variations non-verbal communication plays an important role in these places. It includes the usage of the human’s subconscious mind to construct a series of facial expressions, hand gestures as well as the usage of the human’s vocal tones which indeed causes a form of effective communication if used in the right manner. For example, when parentsRead MoreThe Importance Of Active Listening, Positive Verbal Communication And Understanding Level Of Communication1588 Words   |  7 PagesPositive Verbal Communication and Understanding Level of Communication with Different Clients. Communication is an essential skill that involves the ability to exchange our attitude, thoughts and feelings through written, verbal and non-verbal interaction with each other (Crisp, Potter, Perry, 2013). In a wide range of workplaces, these interactions are primarily used to develop professional relationships with clients. To discuss the importance of effective communication in workplaces, I had theRead MoreEffective Communication Is Vital for Sucees in Professional, Corporate, and Academic Environments579 Words   |  3 PagesEffective communication skills are vital to success in professional, corporate, and academic environments. We are evaluated daily on our ability to communicate efficiently in interactions that take place at work, as well as in our personal lives. According to Faye and Jerry Wisner, communication is the process by which we verbally or nonverbally convey a message to another person or a group of people in a way that can be received and understood. The two ty pes of communication found to be most effectiveRead MoreCommunication : Verbal And Non Verbal Communication1216 Words   |  5 PagesCommunication is a complex activity which involve verbal and non-verbal communication, the topic under discussion, the prejudgments that people bring to the topic, and the â€Å"communication history† between participants in the discussion. A Speaker who transmits message must ensure that the message is delivered clearly. A listener who takes the messages must be an active listener. As effective communication can only take place when the recipient of the message understands it’s meaning and able to expressRead MoreInterpersonal Communication And The Workplace946 Words   |  4 PagesInterpersonal communication in the workplace is developed positively or negatively on the individual relationships we have combined with our human behaviors and human actions within each of those relationships. There are many things that can affect interpers onal communications within the workplace, from generational that create technological gaps, to diversity and tolerance it creates, and finally the type of workplace, is it a team environment encouraging inclusiveness within the organization orRead MoreEffective Communication Skills Are Essential For Success1222 Words   |  5 PagesIntroduction Effective Communication skills are essential for success in every organization. Individuals today in the workplace need to effectively communicate with employees, customers and potential clients. Effective and clear communication if not delivered in the right manner could be interpreted by the receiver and have a negative impact. There are many barriers that can effect a conversation such as cultural differences, gender and environment. Employees can learn how to adapt in differentRead MoreMotivation, Stress, and Communication1713 Words   |  7 Pagesï » ¿Motivation, Stress and Communication: As part of analyzing motivation, stress, and communication in the workplace, I have selected the position of human service manager in United Way of Central Indiana. The company is located in Indianapolis and focuses on helping to sustain significant services for people in need of help and preventing the occurrence of such needs for future generations. United Way of Central Indiana has two major priorities that are centered on providing important human servicesRead MoreEffective Workplace Communication1336 Words   |  6 PagesListening and Effective Workplace Communication James Humes, a former presidential speech writer, stated that, the art of communication is the language of leadership (Leading Thoughts, 2010). Communication is an essential process that is common in the workplace.   Everyone in the workplace especially leaders must communicate with others.   Ideas, conversations, disagreements, and commitments can all be exchanged through communication.   Anyone can communicate but it takes discipline and skillsRead MoreThe Significant Principles of Management Communications2466 Words   |  7 Pagesï » ¿ Research Paper: The Significant Principles of Management Communications Mia A. Rapier BUS 600: Management Communication with Technology Tools Instructor Cheryl Moore July 27, 2014 It’s been understood that â€Å"communication in business involves a complex set of unwritten rules governing speech, written correspondence and body language that varies in different parts of the world† (Ingram, 2014). Communication is the essential component of business, â€Å"from the entry-level manager to theRead MoreDear Sacramento Chinese Community Service Center,. I Have1409 Words   |  6 PagesDear Sacramento Chinese Community Service Center, I have been recently taking an interpersonal communication course and have discovered a great deal of information that I believe can be extremely beneficial to our agency’s communication effectiveness. I invite you all to think back to one of our previous meetings, do you recall any of the following? A lack of eye contact, a lack of enthusiasm, and frustrated looks on faces? How about an overall sense of discontent so much so that people are disengaged

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Police Brutality Use Of Excessive And Unnecessary Force...

Police brutality is the use of excessive and unnecessary force by police when dealing with civilians. Police brutality can be present in many ways. The most common form of police brutality is a physical form. Police officers can use nerve gas, batons, pepper spray, and guns in order to physically intimidate or even intentionally hurt civilians. Police brutality can also take the form of false arrests, verbal abuse, psychological intimidation, sexual abuse, police corruption, racial profiling, political repression and the improper use of Tasers. Black people are mostly affected by white cops. Cops are given a lot of scope in performing their obligations. Since they are relied upon to ensure general society and stand up to possibly rough people, they can lawfully utilize physical, and even fatal, power in specific situations. Be that as it may, an officer who uses power when it is not called for, or who utilizes more constraints than is important to perform his or her occupation, m ay go too far into police ruthlessness. Police brutality should be controlled and stopped because its getting out of hand and is killing our African American youth. The term is not a lawful term and the definition is in this manner somewhat delicate; it might be best portrayed by method for instance. A recent case of police brutality occurred on August 9, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. Flatow said: This case sparked many other cases similar to Mike Brown’s situation. He was shot and killedShow MoreRelatedPolice Brutality : Use Of Excessive And Unnecessary Force By Police1536 Words   |  7 Pages Police brutality is the use of excessive and unnecessary force by police when dealing with civilians. Police brutality can be present in many ways. The most common form of police brutality is a physical form. Police officers can use nerve gas, batons, pepper spray, and guns in order to physically intimidate or even intentionally hurt civilians. Police brutality can also take the form of false arrests, verbal abuse, psychological intimidation, sexual abuse, police corruption, racial profilingRead MorePolice Brutality And Crime Brutality833 Words   |  4 PagesPolice Brutality Police brutality is defined as the use of excessive or unnecessary force by police when dealing with civilians (What Is Police Brutality?). Recently, there have been a surplus of incidents involving police brutality. Cases like Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and Tamir Rice are examples of police brutality. All three of these victims ended up dead at the hands of police. Statistics show that, just this year alone, 1,013 Americans have been killed by cops (Cop Crisis). Social mediaRead MorePolice Brutality And Police Cruelty1118 Words   |  5 PagesPolice brutality has occurred all across the world and is still a major amongst society and police organization. This brutality arranges from assaults, death as a result, of use of force, harassment, Etc. It takes two forms which is physical brutality which includes assaults, and non-physical brutality which includes use of verbal language. Police officers have been granted the privilege of using â€Å"non-negotiable force† (Bittner 19 70) to control citizens’ behavior and ensure public order. Police useRead MoreRacism And White Privilege Enforcement Essay1292 Words   |  6 PagesPolice officers, who were once referred to as peace keepers, are now more law enforcement officers. Police agencies around the United States seem to be stuck more on quotas and creating revenue for their county or city. Making many officers strive for many unnecessary arrests. Which as a following result has brought up a lot of tension between the police and their citizens. With increasing violence in cities and states; police officers methods have slowly become more aggressive, bringing a rise inRead MoreFree Argumentative Essays : Police Brutality738 Words   |  3 Pages J Free Argumentative Essays: Police Brutality 777 Words 4 Pages Police Brutality Police work is dangerous. Sometimes police put in situations that excessive force is needed. But, because some officers use these extreme measures in situations when it is not, police brutality should be addressed. The use of excessive force may or may not be large problem, but it should be looked into by both the police and the public. For those people who feel racismRead MorePolice Brutality Essay747 Words   |  3 PagesPolice Brutality James Regas December 15, 1996 Outline Thesis: But, because some officers use these extreme measures when it is not needed, police brutality should be addressed. I. Police Brutality A. Racism as a cause II. Police Brutality is not a problem A. Quotes from authorities B. Statistics of Declining Brutality III. Stopping Police Brutality A. Police Stopping themselves Read MoreFreedom Of Speech : The Boston Tea Party Essay1375 Words   |  6 PagesAmerica was a rebel. America rebelled against British forces and made America their own. Freedom of speech was important and America was based on protests. The most famous protest was the Boston Tea Party. However, shortly after gaining independence from England, America started to use their own troops to stop rebellions. In 1792, which was only 5 years after the Bill of Rights was ratified, congress passed the Calling Forth Act. This law gave â€Å"the president the authority to unilaterallyRead MorePolice Brutality And The Police1585 Words   |  7 PagesPolice brutality and office involved shootings have sparked national debate and created a strain between police officers and citizens. Recently, there have been more home videos that display acts of aggression by police officers. These police officers often use excessive forces or a condescending tone towards people of color which is why there needs to be a better way to mend police and civilian relationship. People should be able to trust the police in their communities rather than fear them. PoliceRead MorePolice bruality essay for college class i guess1365 Words   |  6 PagesPolice Brutality Police brutality occurs daily across America. Police brutality can come in various forms, counting lethal and nonlethal force. Comprehending the exact commonness of police brutality is complex, because of the inconsistency in describing police brutality. The trouble in differentiating among justified and unjustified force. Police interactions often can be misconstrued, or sometimes turned around against an officer. Questionable behavior and complaints against officers can be filedRead MorePolice Brutality Based On Racial Profiling1682 Words   |  7 Pagesothers; violence and brutality against innocent citizens is the key to getting the job done. For years, minorities have fallen victim to police brutality based on racial profiling, stereotypes and other unjustifiable reasons that has cost several innocent lives. The involvement of officers in police brutality against minority social groups causes tainted and negative views on policing and their overall duty to protect, when they are ultimately the aggressors in this case. Police brutality is a violent incident

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Critical Evaluation of Evidence for Health- myassignmenthelp.com

Question: Discuss about theCritical Evaluation of Evidence for Health Professionals. Answer: Introduction Health professionals should be well-informed with current knowledge to allow them to deliver effective care and remain professionally pertinent. Also, it is vital for care providers to investigate the quality of new evidence before application in practice. Nursing research allows nurses to embrace best practice and evidence-based practice (EBP). The primary role of EBP is to deliver the most effective care that is available, with the aim of promoting patient outcome. This role is buttressed by the fact that clients expect to receive the best care based on the present evidence. EBP promotes a culture of inquiry in healthcare professional. It also promotes patient safety, improves clinical outcomes and minimises variation in patient outcomes (Boswell Cannon, 2015). Nurses thus require critical appraisal skills as well as tools to advance their practice. Critical evaluation skills help users to determine which evidence is authoritative for use in practice. This assignment will evaluate the evidence presented in two articles on the use of stimulants to improve academic performance. Part B will discuss the barriers to the application of evidence in practice and how closely the articles adhere to the PICO elements. Hildt, E., Lieb, K., Franke, A. G. (2014). Life context of pharmacological academic performance enhancement among university students a qualitative approach. BMC Medical Ethics, 15(1), 23-23. doi:10.1186/1472-6939-15-23 Authorship The authors are better placed to explore this topic due to their qualification and experience of working in the university. Hildt is an expert in philosophy and heads neuroethics research groups. Besides, her focus and interest is neurophilosophy, neuroethics and human genetics (Illes Sahakian, 2013). Her knowledge in this area allows a better understanding of the human brain, principles of thoughts and conscience (Rabadan, 2015). Hildt is affiliated to the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz. Lieb and Franke are experts in psychiatry and psychotherapy. Based on their expertise, these authors understand mental illnesses and prescriptions. Both authors are affiliated to University Medical Centre where they work in the department of psychiatry and psychotherapy. The three authors declared that they have no competing interest in relation to the topic of study. Research aims The study aimed to investigate the students experience and the effects of the use of prescription and illicit stimulants such as methylphenidate and amphetamines. Their research questions were: Why are stimulants used in academic contexts either by students and other persons? What are the impacts? Does the usage of stimulants in academic contexts offer benefits? How are students life affected? What are the side-effects encountered? (Hildt, Lieb, Franke, 2014).The authors noted that there was lack of evidence-based data about the circumstantial factors as well as the real world impacts of academic performance enhancement through the use of stimulant drugs. This argument was used to justify the need for study. Design The study used a sampling methodology, whereby 18 university students were involved. Only the participants who reported non-medical intake of illicit and prescription stimulants to improve academic performance were included in the study. A face-to-face interview was then conducted with a focus on the research questions. In a population, random sampling ensures that a subset (n) of the target population (N) is recruited. This method was appropriate for this study because the findings can be generalized (Bornstein, Jager Putnick, 2013). Also, the researchers can tailor the questions based on sociodemographic factors. Findings The findings answered the aim and research questions comprehensively. Based on the conclusion, students consider stimulants as beneficial for enhancing academic performance and leading an active life. Students indicated that they use stimulants to maximise time, enhance motivation and help in memorizing (Hildt, Lieb, Franke, 2014). On the effects of stimulants, the conclusion notes that there is inconsistency in the use of stimulants and academic performance. Strengths and weaknesses The primary strength of the study is the use of randomised sampling, which allows for the generalisation of results (Greenhalgh, Bidewell, Crisp, Lambros, Warland, 2017). Also, the right population was selected for this study. The major weakness of the research is coercion and undue influence over the student participating in the study. Students can offer informed consent in research; however, in a student-tutor relationship, it might be challenging to determine whether consent was sought. Munro, B. A., Weyandt, L. L., Marraccini, M. E., Oster, D. R. (2017). The relationship between nonmedical use of prescription stimulants, executive functioning and academic outcomes. Addictive Behaviors, 65, 250-257. doi:https://ift.tt/2fDSHfZ Authorship The authors have expertise in diverse fields and can articulate the issue of the use of stimulants effectively. They integrated interdisciplinary knowledge to examine the topic. Both Munro and Weyandt are engaged in interdisciplinary neuroscience program and are affiliated with the University of Rhode Island. Marraccini, on the other hand, has expertise in medicine and is affiliated with several institutions including the University of Rhode Island. Oster specialises in psychology enabling them to understand the human brain and its functions. Oster is also affiliated with the University of Rhode Island. All the authors indicated that they did not have interests to disclose in relation to the study (Munro, Weyandt, Marraccini, Oster, 2017). Research aims The aim of their study was to analyse the relationship between nonmedical use of prescription stimulants (NMUPS) and executive functioning (EF) among college students. The authors hypothesised that students who have EF problems are likely to use NMUPS to enhance academic performance. Additionally, they hypothesised that NMUPS would facilitate the association between academic performance and EF (Munro, Weyandt, Marraccini, Oster, 2017). The authors justified the study by arguing that previous studies had not focused on the link between EF and NMUPS among college students. Design In this research, a convenience sample was selected from the eligible participants. Specifically, participants were recruited through email and Facebook web pages. A secure and encrypted site was used to allow the students deliver their feedback. The student demographic information was collected through questionnaires. A stimulant survey questionnaire (SSQ) was then used to quantify the extent of NMUPS (Munro, Weyandt, Marraccini, Oster, 2017). The SSQ was appropriate for the study because it consists of a self-reported part, which allows students to answer yes or no. In addition, BDEFS for adults was also used to evaluate the misuse of stimulants among the selected population. The BDEFS was effective because it is inexpensive and offers useful information on a facet of EF in everyday activities (Barkley, 2011). Findings The findings of this study supported only one hypothesis. Based on the results, students who had EF problems had higher chances of NMUPS than those without EF problems. Nevertheless, the findings failed to support the hypothesis that there is a positive relationship between NMUPS and academic performance (Munro, Weyandt, Marraccini, Oster, 2017). Strengths and weaknesses The strength of this article is the focus on the relationship between EF and NMUPS only. This focus led to a comprehensive study that answers the hypothesis succinctly. The main weakness of the study was the use of a convenience sample, which limits the generalisation of the results. The barriers for the application of evidence in practice Several factors act as barriers to the implementation of research findings. The lack of enough time for searching and reading articles is a key barrier (Al-Kubaisi, Al-Dahnaim Salama, 2010). In one study, it was found that only 4.8 percent of nurses had read scientific articles weekly. This study also found that about 17.5 percent of all the nurses did not read scientific articles entirely (Oh, 2008). Based on the fact that clinical science databases are updated constantly, and illnesses, drugs and treatment techniques are constantly changing, failure to read scientific works is a serious thing. Another barrier is the lack of adequate time to execute new ideas. Nurses require enough time for research and implementation of clinical findings (Bahadori, Raadabadi, Ravangard, Mahaki, 2016). However, most nurses feel that their workload does not leave adequate time as well as energy to execute new ideas. This belief causes most nurses not to apply the evidence of research in practice. T ime management is thus an important barrier since implementing research evidence is time-consuming (Tacia, Biskupski, Pheley Lehto, 2015). The lack of enough facilities and equipment to apply new evidence is a barrier. Some healthcare institutions fail to provide the needed facilities to facilitate the application of findings. This factor leaves nurses with no proper setting to use the evidence drawn from their research. The lack of interest in research causes nurses fail to embrace empirical evidence in practice. Some nurses have a negative attitude towards research and thus do not appreciate new evidence. Additionally, nurses might lack the authority to change the techniques and patterns of care. These barriers are mainly individual factors although institutional factors play a fundamental role in the application of evidence in practice (Shifaza, Evans Bradley, 2014). How closely the research studies provided align with the PICO question/elements PICO is an acronym for population, intervention, comparison and outcome, a tool that is often used for inquiry search in health (Richardson-Tench, Taylor, Kermode, Roberts, 2016). In the PICO question, the population (P) is university performance, intervention (I) is stimulants and outcome (O) is academic performance. To determine how closely the research articles align with the PICO elements, there is a need to analyse their methods and methodology. The closeness of the article to the PICO is determined by the participants included in the study and interventions used. In the first article, Hildt and colleagues seem to deviate a bit from the PICO elements. The selected population in the study was right since only university students were included. Also, the intervention was right based on the PICO question because the authors focused on the use of stimulants only. However, the authors did not measure academic performance as the sole outcome. Instead, they focused on other outcomes such as general effects. The second article by Munro and colleagues was closely related to the PICO elements. The researchers did not seem to deviate from the PICO elements in the recruitment of participants and measuring of outcomes. In this research, Munro and colleagues recruited university students, focused on the use of stimulants and measured academic achievement as the only outcome. Conclusion As discussed in this assignment, the authors of the two articles strived to investigate the use of stimulants to improve academic performance. The articles seem to agree that university students use stimulants often. However, there is no evidence that stimulants improve academic performance. The two studies note that stimulants might improve awareness, memorisation and motivation, but may not improve direct academic performance. Wasim can use this evidence to determine if stimulants are related to high academic performance for university students. The student would realise that the use of smart drugs does not improve objective performance. The evidence provided by the two articles is authoritative since the authors know how the human brain functions. They are also affiliated with reputable universities and used primary data from university students who have been using stimulants. The other area of focus for this assignment was the barriers to the implementation of evidence in practic e. Most of the barriers arise from personal factors and can be addressed. Nurses require more knowledge on how to use scientific databases and time management skills for application of evidence in practice. References Al-Kubaisi, N.J., Al-Dahnaim, L. A. Salama, R. E. (2010). Knowledge, attitudes and practice of primary health care physicians towards evidence-based medicine in Doha, Qatar. East Mediterr Health J.16(11), 1189-1197. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21218744 Bahadori, M., Raadabadi, M., Ravangard, R., Mahaki, B. (2016). The barriers to the application of the research findings from the nurses perspective: A case study in a teaching hospital. Journal of education and health promotion, 5(1) 14. doi: 10.4103/2277-9531.184553 Barkley, R, A. (2011). The Barkley deficits in executive functioning scale. New York, NY: Guilford Press. Bornstein, M. H., Jager, J., Putnick, D. L. (2013). Sampling in developmental science: Situations, shortcomings, solutions, and standards. Developmental Review, 33(4), 357-370. doi: 10.1016/j.dr.2013.08.003 Boswell, C., Cannon, S. (2015). Introduction to nursing research. Jones Bartlett Publishers. Greenhalgh, T.M., Bidewell, J., Crisp, E., Lambros, A., Warland, J. (2017). Understanding research methods for evidence-based practice in health 1e Wileyplus learning space Wiley e-text powered by Vitalsource. Wiley. Retrieved from https://ift.tt/2xjnxVh 1ACUsearch_scope=61ACU_Alltab=61acu_alllang=en_US Hildt, E., Lieb, K., Franke, A. G. (2014). Life context of pharmacological academic performance enhancement among university students a qualitative approach. BMC Medical Ethics, 15(1), 23-23. doi:10.1186/1472-6939-15-23 Illes, J., Sahakian, B. J. (Eds.). (2013). Oxford handbook of neuroethics. Oxford University Press. Munro, B. A., Weyandt, L. L., Marraccini, M. E., Oster, D. R. (2017). The relationship between nonmedical use of prescription stimulants, executive functioning and academic outcomes. Addictive Behaviors, 65, 250-257. doi:https://ift.tt/2fDSHfZ Oh, E. G. (2008). Research activities and perceptions of barriers to research utilization among critical care nurses in Korea. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, 24(5), 314-322. doi: 10.1016/j.iccn.2007.12.001 Rabadn, A. T. (2015). Neuroethics scope at a glance. Surgical neurology international, 6, 183. doi: 10.4103/2152-7806.171249 Richardson-Tench, M., Taylor, B., Kermode, S., Roberts, K. (2016). Inquiry in health care (5th [ACU] ed.). South Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning. Shifaza, F., Evans, D., Bradley, H. (2014). Nurses Perceptions of Barriers and Facilitators to Implement EBP in Maldives. Advances in Nursing, 2014. https://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/698604 Tacia, L., Biskupski, K., Pheley, A., Lehto, R. H. (2015). Identifying barriers to evidence-based practice adoption: A focus group study. Clinical Nursing Studies, 3(2), 90-96. doi 10.5430/cns.v3n2p90

Monday, April 13, 2020

Greyson Phelan Essays - Marketing, World Wide Web, Alphabet Inc.

Greyson Phelan Dr. Lartz Writing 107 2 November 2017 Online Market Manipulation: Who can You Even Trust Anymore? Advertisements, Marketing, and the way companies and consumers use the internet has changed almost completely from what it was only about a decade ago. With the ever-growing dependency people have on the internet, companies have found ways to manipulate the kind of advertisements consumers view, take information on consumers and use it toward them, and even go as far as to manipulate search results on widely used search engines such as Google. Olivia Salon and Sam Levin wrote a joint article together for The Guardian titled "How Google's search algorithm spreads false information with a right-wing bias" that discusses and reveals how Google search results, an online information tool used by millions every day, have and still can be altered to show biased political, social, and religious result. Along with this, Mark Bartholomew published an article for the Los Angeles Review of Books titled "Hiding in Plain View: The Past and Present of Manipulative Advertising" which provides an analysis of the way social media platforms, online firms, and advertising companies all use the personal information of consumers to specify what websites, advertisements, and products they view online. How does today's digital environment manipulate and persuade consumers and their views? Salon and Levin's article is effective with their use of persuasive images and pathos by providing actual screenshots of maligned and biased Google search results and how destructive their results can be, and Bartholomew's article uses logos and ethos effectively by recounting the ways companies advertised in the past and how they have progressed to molding adds around the very individual consumer. From reading these articles, I have developed my own thoughts and beliefs on the topic of digital environment and consumer manipulation and just how severe of a problem this is not just in the present day, but in the future as well. Salon and Levin's article, "How Google's search algorithm spreads false information with a right-wing bias" highlights the very real situation of incorrect and biased search results and the problems that the dissemination of misinformation can cause for consumers which is being done by search engines, specifically Google. The two journalists go on in depth about accounts of Google changing their search results to be politically biased and the dangers this can cause for consumers and voters by having this ongoing dissemination of misinformation. Salon and Levin go in further to describe the role even Facebook has and how they created incentives for users to generate misleading content on their platform. By allowing for spaces and incentives like this to exist, these companies are supporting the practice of misleading and manipulating the consumer to benefit themselves through an online platform. Salon and Levin continue past this to talk directly about the algorithm Google uses for its search engine and how there are actually a great deal of flaws that can be and have been manipulated by politically motivated groups in the past. The journalists end their article by quoting a Google representative describing how their search algorithm is not exact at all, in fact it has many flaws in which they try to fix constantly and can be exploited by the smart few. Salon and Levin use the rhetorical strategies of persuasive images and logos to buttress their points in their article well. By using persuasive images along with their article, Salon and Levin provide picture evidence that the reader can see for themselves of Google and their disparaging search results. For example, when looking up climate change, the image was provided of varying search results coming up all around the lines of "climate change is a hoax" or "climate change is fake". By doing this, Salon and Levin are really able to open the readers eyes to the biased information they can receive from a generally trusted source such as Google. Along with these persuasive images, the journalists present logical and well thought out arguments decrying these biased results. By using pathos, the journalists appeal to the reader's emotional and human side by trying to show how offensive and wrong the information you view online can be to others. I agree with

Wednesday, March 11, 2020

Free Essays on The Rabbits Of Watership Down

The main rabbit in the story Watership Down is Hazel. Hazel is the leader of the rabbits who leave the Sandleford warren. The word hazel means â€Å"reconciliation†. Hazel shows this quality when he tries to make amends with General Woundwort after Bigwig leads the does from the Efrafa warren. He comes up with a solution that is good for both warrens and tries to solve their problem. The plant witch hazel is occasionally used for medicinal purposes. In the book, Hazel gives medical attention to different rabbits who become injured during one of their many adventures. The word bluebell means â€Å"consistency†. In the story Bluebell shows great consistency in protecting Holly after they escape the Sandleford warren. Holly, a former captain of the Owsla, is injured and cannot move very fast. Bluebell stayed with him for the entire trip to watership down, and speaks for him when the other rabbits find them. The plant bluebell is a wild flower. In the book. Bluebell acts a little more wildly than the others by telling jokes in odd situations. Strawberry is a rabbit met at Cowslip’s warren. He becomes friends with some of the wandering rabbits and eventually leaves his warren to go with them. This is how Strawberry is similar to the plant he is named for. The typical strawberry plant has short roots; Strawberry himself has short roots because he leaves his warren without taking much time to make his decision. The word strawberry means â€Å"esteem†. Strawberry shows his esteem towards the other rabbits by listening to their opinions and trusting them from the beginning of their journey together. Holly is a captain in the Sandleford warren, but does not join the other rabbits until his warren has been destroyed and the other rabbits have reached watership down. The word holly means â€Å"foresight†. When Hazel takes the group to retrieve does from Efrafa, Holly uses his foresight and good judgment ... Free Essays on The Rabbits Of Watership Down Free Essays on The Rabbits Of Watership Down The main rabbit in the story Watership Down is Hazel. Hazel is the leader of the rabbits who leave the Sandleford warren. The word hazel means â€Å"reconciliation†. Hazel shows this quality when he tries to make amends with General Woundwort after Bigwig leads the does from the Efrafa warren. He comes up with a solution that is good for both warrens and tries to solve their problem. The plant witch hazel is occasionally used for medicinal purposes. In the book, Hazel gives medical attention to different rabbits who become injured during one of their many adventures. The word bluebell means â€Å"consistency†. In the story Bluebell shows great consistency in protecting Holly after they escape the Sandleford warren. Holly, a former captain of the Owsla, is injured and cannot move very fast. Bluebell stayed with him for the entire trip to watership down, and speaks for him when the other rabbits find them. The plant bluebell is a wild flower. In the book. Bluebell acts a little more wildly than the others by telling jokes in odd situations. Strawberry is a rabbit met at Cowslip’s warren. He becomes friends with some of the wandering rabbits and eventually leaves his warren to go with them. This is how Strawberry is similar to the plant he is named for. The typical strawberry plant has short roots; Strawberry himself has short roots because he leaves his warren without taking much time to make his decision. The word strawberry means â€Å"esteem†. Strawberry shows his esteem towards the other rabbits by listening to their opinions and trusting them from the beginning of their journey together. Holly is a captain in the Sandleford warren, but does not join the other rabbits until his warren has been destroyed and the other rabbits have reached watership down. The word holly means â€Å"foresight†. When Hazel takes the group to retrieve does from Efrafa, Holly uses his foresight and good judgment ...

Monday, February 24, 2020

Gender Inequalities in Organizations Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3750 words

Gender Inequalities in Organizations - Essay Example The discussion aims at highlighting and underpinning the concept of equality of opportunities for women that will offer likely benefits and advantages to the business and social environment of the Saudi Arabia. It has been seen and perceived that women are incapable and unfit for certain kind of jobs and men get undue advantages and benefits in the social and business environment. The discussion identifies the importance and need of equality in the business environment to create a favorable and positive business environment for men and women. Women are often subjected to sexual harassment and abuses compared to men and creating a positive environment will only empower them in the present as well as in the future. The discussion also aims at understanding the reasons behind gender inequality along with identifying problems and issues pertaining to it in the business and social environment. For this purpose, the social and business environment of Saudi Arabia has been assessed and analysed. At the same time, the educational and social environment has been analysed in terms of impact and influence. It is important to change the educational structure along with reducing the impact and influence of social and economic constraints to attract more number of women in the national work force. This requires equal rights and equality in everything without discriminating against the gender. It also requires help and support of public and private sector organizations to create a base for Saudi women in terms of exposing them to business ins and outs along with offering training to enhance their skills. Therefore, the role of public and private sector organisations has also been assessed and analysed in a critical, illustrative manner.... However, with 15% of national workforce comprising of women, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is yet to utilize untapped potentials of its work force especially those of women (UNDP, 2008). The current work force is driven by majority of expatriates who have been contributing to the success and development of the country. However, the role of nationals comprising of men and women with potential to perform and contribute remains obsolete. The majority of these are women who have not been exposed to the business environment. There is no denying that legislative, social, occupational and educational constraints prevent women to participate in the Saudi labor market but things need to be changed in order to offer equal opportunities to people without differentiating on the basis of the gender. Saudi Arabia is a powerful economy with wide arrays of business opportunities. In order to emerge as a dynamic and global force, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia needs to overcome these constraints. Sambidge (2011) stated that the Arab nations continue to lag behind other nations when it comes to gender equality. As per the report published by the World Economic Forum Global Gender Gap, 2011, no Middle East country was in the list of top 100 countries for gender equality out of the 135 countries covered. UAE was ranked at (103), followed by Kuwait (105), Bahrain (110), Oman (127) and Saudi Arabia (131). However, things have been changing at a rapid pace as women are now allowed to vote for the very first time highlighting the growth and acceptance of gender equality. The notion of men leading men and women has been prevailing from early centuries. This argument can be considered as the base for the start of inequalities between the genders. However, the mode of discrimination seems to